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Friday, June 5

  1. page Tucker Dupree edited ... 2. When Tucker came to talk to us today I found it very interesting. It was interesting becaus…
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    2. When Tucker came to talk to us today I found it very interesting. It was interesting because he did not seem to be fazed by losing his eye sight, other than the fact that he could not drive. I found it inspirational how when asked if there was a cure for it would it want to have it done. His answer was not right now because he liked were he was, but that he would want to have it done later because he would want to drive his kids to school. Another thing that I admired about him was that he just thought of losing his eye sight as a speed bump not a mountain. And that he still wants to live have a normal life.
    3. I think that Tucker coming to talk to us was a really great idea. I loved how positive he was about his condition and how he turned it into something that changed his life. I also think that it was amazing how swimming wasn't even that important to him when he first started off and as life went on, swimming became a huge part of his life, as well as dealing with his vision loss. Tucker had a very positive outlook on life. The way he coped with his sudden vision loss and doing everyday activities just like anyone else showed how strong he was and how he wouldn't let this one thing take over his life. He mentioned his parents a lot and how they were his main support system. He mentioned how his dad told him that his vision loss was just a little speed bump in his life and that he could overcome it and live like he had been living before he was diagnosed. I also rly liked his sense of humor when he was talking about his vision loss. He didn't make us feel sorry for him at all or look at him any differently. He was very inspiring and positive about everything he had to deal with. i thought his incredible swimming ability was amazing to hear about also. All the awards he has won and all the medals, and all the goals he had achieved already. I thought it was really cool for him to talk to us about how he had achieved so many things by swimming and how he could end up going to the actual Olympics. Him talking to us was just a really great experience for me and it makes me realize how fortunate i am and how i should be thankful for my parents and everything else in life. I really enjoyed him talking to us. (Also he is really cute and smells wonderful :D okay bye)
    4.Tucker4. Tucker spoke about
    I no longer feel like I have a right to complain about ANYTHING. He's been through so much, but he learned how to swim without sight and he does it all with a smile. His only gripe is that he won't be able to drive his kids to school. I really admire him and I think his visit here was the most powerful of the whole Discover Term so far.
    5.Today,5. Today, my discovery
    The last few things he talked about was the medals he got. Last year at the USA Open Swimming Championships he won six different gold medals. The year before that (2007), he won two gold and four silver medals during the Pan-American Games and also four more silver there in the same year. Every year it seems that he's been improving (by getting more gold medals each year). Tucker is an excellent swimmer; when he told us his times I flipped out. He could be in the Olympics with Michael Phelps -- I mean, he has good enough times. Plus, he has vision loss- I'm just still in shock how he's still such a fast swimmer and he has 80% of his vision gone. Tucker also holds multiple records he holds in the Paralympics. He is 4th in the 400 meter freestyle, 5th in the 100 meter freestyle, 3th in the 100 meter backstroke, 5th in the 100 meter butterfly, 6th in the 50 meter freestyle and 7th in the 200 individual medley. Overall, this was a great experience and I enjoyed everything he had to say. Tucker is such a nice and funny person. He made discovery term very exciting and it was such a good idea to invite him to tell us about everything he's been through.
    Photos:
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    7:22 am
  2. page Tucker Dupree edited ... “I've never been depressed on my loss of sight. I've never been upset. It's who I am now and I…
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    “I've never been depressed on my loss of sight. I've never been upset. It's who I am now and I don't know if I would change it."
    “As long as I put my 100 percent effort in, that's what I'm happy with."
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    has a taklingtalking alarm clock
    Tucker does not let his vision loss stop him from reading but he does use a tool to help him, "I have 80% loss. All I see is peripheral. I have a 14x pocket magnifier, that's how I read my cell phone text messages."
    On the issue of driving it must have been tough for tucker to only drive for a short period of time but he handled it with great maturity, "One day I noticed I could not see stop lights in both lights, I knew when to stop and go by seeing what cars around me are doing. I thought to myself, this isn't safe. I drove into my driveway and put the car in park and looked in rear view mirror and I realized it would be the last day I ever sat in driver's seat with keys in my hand and drove. I went inside the kitchen, put the keys and my driver's license on table and slid them to my mom and told her I can't drive any more. It was the day I had to turn in my independence."
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    1. When we met with Tucker this morning, I felt from that moment my mind state would change about people with different challenges. When he began to speak to us about his story, and how he got to where he is now. I felt truly empowered by his words, and how emotionally stable he was from the start with his disability. For someone to go through life and be as strong as him takes a ton of courage and integrity. I truly enjoyed this experience.
    2. When Tucker came to talk to us today I found it very interesting. It was interesting because he did not seem to be fazed by losing his eye sight, other than the fact that he could not drive. I found it inspirational how when asked if there was a cure for it would it want to have it done. His answer was not right now because he liked were he was, but that he would want to have it done later because he would want to drive his kids to school. Another thing that I admired about him was that he just thought of losing his eye sight as a speed bump not a mountain. And that he still wants to live have a normal life.
    ...
    his parents alota lot and how
    ...
    loss. He didntdidn't make us
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    to the actuall olympics.actual Olympics. Him talking
    4.Tucker spoke about his swimming career, what it was like to lose 80% of his vision during his senior year of high school, and what it meant to him to be able to compete in Bejing in the 2008 Paralympics. He met Lochte and Hoff, two swimmers whom I admire more than anybody in the world. He went through all the same experiences as the US Olympic team, but competed one week later. All with only being able to see from his peripherals. To me, that's amazing.
    I no longer feel like I have a right to complain about ANYTHING. He's been through so much, but he learned how to swim without sight and he does it all with a smile. His only gripe is that he won't be able to drive his kids to school. I really admire him and I think his visit here was the most powerful of the whole Discover Term so far.
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    7:22 am
  3. page Tucker Dupree edited ... {Dupree__Tucker.jpg} Introduction ... and even thought though they didn’t Profile Tu…
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    {Dupree__Tucker.jpg}
    Introduction
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    and even thoughtthough they didn’t
    Profile
    Tucker Dupree was born on May 11, 1989 in Raleigh, North Carolina. He started swimming on a competitive level for RSA (Raleigh Swimming Association) when he was a freshman in high school which was in 2004. In October of 2006 Tucker noticed that he couldn’t see the cool batman sticker on his closet door from his bed in the morning. After visiting the ER at three in the morning and multiple other doctors and specialist he was diagnosed with Lebers Hereditary Optic Neuropathy in November of 2006. Although the doctors told him that he would be totally blind in the next six months but he is going on three years and has about 20% vision left. Tucker said that he always referred to his disease as a “speed bump” in his life and nothing more and definitely not something that would stop him from doing all the things he loves in his life. He continued swimming and in his senior year at Garner High School he was captain and MVP of the swim team. When he graduated in 2007 he had honors and went to Wake Tech Community College in Raleigh to be close to home in case anything happened to him. Amazingly in 2008 Tucker swam in the Paralympic Games in Bejing. He swam in six different events and although not receiving a gold metal he said he was proud of have represented the country and it just gave him something to work towards in the 2012 Paralympic games. Although being mostly blind Tucker is still able to hang out with his friends, play the piano, travel and hang out with his family. Tucker said that the one thing
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    7:15 am
  4. page Gigantism edited ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:People_with_gigantism Sotos Syndrome ... a genetic …
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:People_with_gigantism
    Sotos Syndrome
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    a genetic disorder and type of gigantism.disorder. It's when
    {file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/JEREMY%7E1.ORG/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg}
    Signs and Symptoms:
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    6:23 am
  5. page chernobylchildren edited ... On February 11, 1981 more than 100,000 gallons of radioactive coolant fluid leaked into the Co…
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    On February 11, 1981 more than 100,000 gallons of radioactive coolant fluid leaked into the Contaminant Building at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah 1 Plant in Tennessee.
    About 45 workers were exposed to radioactivity while a plant in Tsuruga, Japan was being repaired on April 25, 1981.
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    accident is considersconsidered the worst
    In November 1992 France's worst nuclear accident occurred. It caused the contamination of three workers who had entered a nuclear particle accelerator in Forbach without protective clothing. For failing to take the proper safety measure, the executives of the plant were put in jail in 1993.
    At least 35 workers had minor radiation after a fire and explosion happened at the power reactor and nuclear fuel development Corporation Reprocessing Plant in Tokaimura, Japan in March of 1997.
    ...
    Those it is widely believed that radiation can cause birth defects, the risk of abnormalities and the consequences for human genes is debates. Some studies including the one by the United Nations Scientific Committee concluded that there were no birth defects caused from the radiation, and yet there are many studies that show an increase in abnormalities. A Belarusian geneticist even showed that the number of birth defects before and after the accident rose proportionately with the amount of radioactive contamination. Researchers also found that the number of birth defects in children born to parents effected by radiation after Chernobyl was seven times higher than children born to these parents before the incident. Whether or not these birth defects are a result of Chernobyl is a huge controversy, and because the accident killed few people at the time, it is often overlooked.
    Mikhaila Rutherford
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    back stroke.
    Mikhaila

    Mikhaila
    was born
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    in college.
    Surprisingly enough, she still keeps contact with her birth family, especially her brother, who is a year younger. There is still contamination where they live. Mikhaila considers herself one of the lucky ones.
    Images of birth defects from Chernobyl
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    6:15 am
  6. page Down Syndrome edited ... Life Expectancy The life expectancy has increased over time ... out live there their pa…
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    Life Expectancy
    The life expectancy has increased over time
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    out live theretheir parents
    Three quarters of kids with down syndrome will die before they are born
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    chance of dieingdying before they
    People with down syndrome have a 35% chance they will die before reaching the age of 50
    The main cause for shortened life is heart problems
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    6:12 am
  7. page home edited For the past two weeks, a group of rising sophomores at Cary Academy have learned about the differe…
    For the past two weeks, a group of rising sophomores at Cary Academy have learned about the differently-abled and the challenges they face. We have met incredible speakers who face challenges everyday, and have learned to overcome them with high spirits and optimism. From them we have learned how important it is to spread awareness, and to not ignore them. In the Table of Contents to the right are links to some of the main themes we have learned. We hope you will also visit the different topics listed on the left side to see the research various groups of students have done. Also, check out this inspiring quote from JFK Jr. Thanks for visiting the Differently-abled wiki!
    Accepting your disability
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    has only 5%20% of his vision.vision left. Despite all
    Overcoming Obstacles
    When people have disabilities they learn to cope with the everyday problems that they face. Some problems such as climbing stairs seem like a simple task for able bodies but for someone in a wheelchair it seems like an impossible feat. In the past two weeks we have learn many things able different disabilities when differently-able speakers have told us their stories. They told us how everyday activities that we take for granted pose challenges to them. For Chris, a twelve year old with muscular dystrophy, the simple task of picking up a dropped pencil is incredible challenge. For Chris he applied for a “Service dog” that would help him with everyday things, such as turning on a light or open a door. Chris’ dog is named Java; their relationship has become such a strong bond that Java becomes miserable when they are parted. Another speaker that we met was Betsey. Betsey has lost 173 degrees of vision; leaving her with only 7 degrees. This disability was a determent, but one good thing came out of this loss; she met her guide dog Janice. With Janice, Betsey can be independent and travel where she wants to go.
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    6:10 am
  8. page Dwarfism edited Dwarfism Rachel, Amanda, Brianna, Harrison, {464px-Thomas_Dilward_-_Brady-Handy.jpg} This i…

    Dwarfism
    Rachel, Amanda, Brianna, Harrison,
    {464px-Thomas_Dilward_-_Brady-Handy.jpg}
    This is a person with achondroplasia.
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    6:06 am

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